a dreamy, foggy place

“The way I remember growing up in Venezuela, for instance, it has nothing to do with the reality that is the country right now. I think I’m from a place, but that place doesn’t exist anymore. When you have to integrate into a new place, you are forced to mix so much information that it becomes unclear who you are. You create a new scenario for yourself. I like to think that it’s some sort of utopia, and to see how I can transmit this sort of dreamy, foggy place.”

Sol Calero in a Tate artist interview describing some of the motivation behind her work (source). I’ve felt something similar at times, though certainly not as intense. It’s a “glass half full” description of the feeling, and her work shares that vibe.

Her commission El Autobús 2019 is at the Tate Liverpool until 10 November 2019.

Side note: I think she’s got an old school Indexhibit site. <3

On Kitty Anderson’s talk about Carol Bove’s work, and on visiting the Barnes Foundation

I recently attended the talk Supporting Structures: The use of plinths and platforms in Carol Bove’s work at the Henry Moore Institute. Kitty Anderson’s talk coincided with the Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa exhibition in the Institute’s main gallery spaces.

Installation view of the Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa exhibition at the Henry Moore Institute

Installation view of the Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa exhibition at the Henry Moore Institute, Gallery 1. Photo via blog Books & Boots (image source)

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Surfing with coffee

Surfing w/ coffee. Order of exploration:

A
Google image search “knyttan blanket scarves” Today and Tomorrow post about a scarf (↓B) Nicolas Sassoon (↓C) Computers Club Alexandria McCrosky Alexandria McCrosky in i want you magazine (↓D) Google image search Alexandria McCrosky

B
Emoji Portraits by Yung Jake on Today and Tomorrow

C
artnet interview w/ Sassoon Opening Times – Digital Art Comissions (↓E) How Do We Write When We Write Online by Orit Gat Gat’s review of The People’s Platform, “Was the internet intended for you?” (↓F) The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age by Astra Taylor

D
Jordan Tate Trevor Paglen exhibition at Altman Siegel Trevor Paglen Jacob Appelbaum (@ioerror)

E
“You Alright” by Nicholas O’Brien “In The Hollow of the Valley” by Nicholas O’Brien NewHive

F
BOMB magazine

Carol Bove on being an artist, excerpt from AKADEMIE X

One question is, how do you create a way of being in the world that allows new things (ideas, information, people, places) into your life without letting everything in?

Carol Bove’s work is currently part of the Carol Bove / Carlo Scarpa exhibition at the Henry Moore Institute. Sam pointed out a recent tweet from the Institute sharing the article linked above, v. glad to come across it and that Artspace was able to publish the extract in full.

Hope to get my hands on this book. In the meantime, see further extracts from AKADEMIE X on Artspace (links at bottom of Bove’s excerpt).

Incidentally, the exhibition is excellent, revisit it when it’s not quite as busy.

Work by Glenn Brown

Painting titled Decline and Fall by Glenn Brown

Decline and Fall from the Arts Council Collection (image source)

Glenn Brown
Decline and Fall, 1995
Oil and canvas on board
58.4 × 54.6cm

Decline and Fall by Glenn Brown is currently on display in the One Day, Something Happens: Paintings of People exhibition at Leeds Art Gallery. The smooth surface of the painting is astounding and incredibly confusing up close, the image above just doesn’t do it justice.

2014 Bloomberg New Contemporaries

Photo of piece titled Pillars II by Katie Hayward

Katie Hayward
Pillars II, 2014
Plastic and industrial fans
Dimensions variable

Took the train to Liverpool recently for the Adrian Henry: Total Artist book launch (published by Occasional Papers, buy it here), and tried to cram in the entire Liverpool Biennial in that one day.

The piece above is part of the 2014 Bloomberg New Contemporaries exhibition in the World Museum and was probably one of my favourite works in the show. Details below the photo (taken on my phone, doesn’t do her piece justice). I don’t think the artist has a personal website just yet, but there’s a bit of information about her here and here.

There was a separate, very loud installation in this part of the exhibition that, IMO, was unfortunately presented. I don’t mind loud sound installations, but the positioning didn’t seem carefully considered in this instance. Sound travels far and fast in those cuboid, hard-surfaced rooms.

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