Showing 1–10 of 51 notes tagged #art.

Just learned about Keith Collins and his relationship with Derek Jarman via Collins’s obituary in the Guardian. What an interesting life. This “how we met” interview with the two of them (The Independent, 1993) is worth reading, and there are some lovely photos around.

SB and I went to Rye with some friends in May 2017 and took a bus out to Dungeness. We just wanted to experience that strange landscape but came across Prospect Cottage as well. It’s all on it’s own, pretty far from much. No plaque or barriers or anything.

It’s a wonder that Collins maintained it for all those years after Jarman’s death. Who is maintaining it now?

Close up of weathered boards and tarring in Dungeness, UK

I’ve always been so impressed by Watith Tanjai’s work. He and his partner are continuing to do great stuff in Nakhonrajchasima, Thailand with 382 space. The Tumblr content is a little out of date, but his FB feed says they’re busy as ever. Looks like they’re dedicating a portion of the space to a nursery, including succulents I’ve never seen before.

Great stuff, hope to visit some day.

“Knot”, a small mixed media piece by Piper Haywood from 2010

Everything has a grain. Sometimes it’s obvious, sometimes less so. This concept started as a little ditty and has grown in to a full blown earworm.

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Screenshot of Tove Jansson swimming in Finland from the BBC documentary Moominland Tales: The Life of Tove Jansson
Screenshot of Tove Jansson swimming from the BBC documentary “Moominland Tales: The Life of Tove Jansson”, around 1:20 mark. View the trailer here.

Until I watched the BBC documentary “Moominland Tales: The Life of Tove Jansson”, I had never really known about the artist and author Tove Jansson nor the context for her work. I’m so glad to have come across the film. She was an impressive and talented woman that lived through some devastating times. The documentary is enhanced by quite a bit of original footage, images, and quotes from her journals and other writings. It also includes interviews of her friends and family. My only criticism would be that the tilt-shift effect on some of the shots of contemporary Helsinki and the Finnish countryside felt a little heavy-handed.

The scene above was likely filmed by Tove Jansson’s partner and great love Tuulikki Pietilä, a Finnish graphic artist. Her nickname was Tooti. For nearly 30 summers, Tove and Tooti lived and worked in a cottage that they built together on a little remote island called Klovharu. It sounds like they were quite the independent adventurers, and their time on the island seemed idyllic. This moment was rather heart-wrenching.

Last summer something unforgivable happened: I started to fear the sea. The giant waves no longer signified adventure but fear. Fear and worry, for the boat and all the other boats that were sailing around in bad weather. We knew it was time to give the cottage away.

Once they had left, they never wanted to come back. They didn’t even want to talk about it. It was the end, and that was it.

A side note: Sophia Jansson’s comment reminded me of a moment in a recent episode of NPR’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me when Peter Sagal asked Norman Lear if he had any tips “for those of us who would like to arrive at 93 as spry and as successful and happy as you are”.

What occurred to me first is two simple words, maybe as simple as any two words in the English language – over and next. We don’t pay enough attention to them. When something is over, it is over, and we are on to next.

I’m looking forward to discovering Tove Jansson’s work. I’ll probably start with the original two Moomins books, then move to The Summer Book and A Winter Book.

Up Projects’ upcoming summer programme sounds fantastic. Apparently it draws much inspiration from “Alternative London” by Nicholas Saunders.

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Edit 2 June 2016 – Purchased a second hand copy of the third edition published 19 June 1972. The photo below doesn’t do the neon cover justice.

Photo of the third edition of “Alternative London” by Nicholas Saunders, a paperback with a pink and yellow cover
The Guidonian Hand 

An essay by Karol Berger from The Medieval Craft of Memory: An Anthology of Texts and Pictures. Relevant to an upcoming Musarc performance conceived by Hefin Jones for an Up Projects event.

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Edit 20 May 2016 — Photo from last night ↓

Photo taken by Laura M A Harford of Musarc performing a Hefin Jones piece for Up Projects

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Edit 24 May 2016 — Even more photos on upprojects.com

I’m looking forward to the long weekend, going to spend a bit of time at the Channa Horwitz exhibition at Raven Row. It’s on until Sunday 1 May 2016.

Image of drawing by Channa Horwitz
Channa Horwitz, Logic for Variation and Inversion on a Rhythm, 1976. Image via VVORK, who in turn seem to have found it via Berlin gallery Aanant & Zoo.

Databases are generally associated less with open-endedness than with the muted horrors of bureaucracy, in which the fear and pain and misery of human experience is reduced to data and evidence.

Off the back of some recent thoughts regarding the archiving of websites, SB sent me a link to “Digital Preservation in the Artist’s Studio” by Ben Fino-Radin. The article provides an extremely thorough overview of what steps might be involved in digitally archiving studio output, along with a few real-world examples. Love this stuff.